Clinical Findings and Disease Severity in Hospitalized Pregnant Women With Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

Bottom Line:

While 20% of women from this study had severe disease (e.g. declining respiratory function, admission to ICU, or both), there were no deaths observed in these patients. In additions, factors such as Body Mass Index (BMI), respiratory rate, and heart rate were associated with severe disease.

Reference:

Valeria, SM. et al. Clinical Findings and Disease Severity in Hospitalized Pregnant Women With Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Obstetrics & Gynecology (2020). doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000003979

Date Published:

10 August 2020

Synopsis:

This study was conducted with patients from 12 Italian maternity hospitals who were admitted between February 23 and March 28, 2020. Patients’ charts, laboratory findings, imaging results, and pregnancy course was examined. Patients with severe disease were defined as those who had admission at the intensive care unit (ICU), required delivery for respiratory compromise, or both. The results showed that 14/77 (18%) patients had severe disease. 84% had symptoms upon admission (e.g. shortness of breath, dry cough, etc). 16% patients had to urgently deliver due to deterioration of their respiratory function, and 8% were admitted to the ICU. One patient received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (a support technique for patients whose heart and lungs are unable to maintain gas exchange to sustain life). In addition, there were no deaths amongst patients. Other notable findings were preterm delivery (e.g. when the baby is born at <37 weeks gestational age) in 12% of patients, and newborn admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (12%). Furthermore, patients with severe disease had significantly higher body mass indexes (BMI; measure of weight per height), heart rate, respiratory rate, fever and shortness of breath on admission.

Summary by: Sheida Naderi-Azad